Frequently Asked Questions

What kinds of vegetables do you grow?

Many different kinds! Currently on the harvest roster are major players such as: carrots, salads, potatoes, beets, broccoli, cabbages, onions, turnips, radishes, kale, tomatoes, herbs, and many more. We also grow smaller quantities of lesser-known veggies such as kohlrabi and celery root.

Is there anything you don't grow? How about mangoes and bananas?

Pemberton’s mountain climate is perfect for cool-loving crops, like broccoli and carrots. Since many popular heat-loving plants like peppers, cucumbers and tomatoes can be finicky here, we prioritize growing them for taste and for quality rather than quantity.
If you're wanting a harvest share with tons of peppers and eggplants, you may want to consider other CSA farms for a better fit. At the risk of sounding sassy, if you're looking for local mangoes we gently suggest you consider moving further south.

Do you have smaller sizes or half-share alternatives?

There is just the one CSA share size, and it tends to work for most people. If you're sure it will be too much food, ask a friend or neighbour if they would like to split a share. With our market-style pickups, it is also fully OK (and expected) that you may not take the full amount of every single item depending on how you eat at home.

Is the farm open to the public? Can we come and visit?

Yes and no. With the fast-pace of our work and busy days as a crew in the field, the farm is not generally open to the public. That said, we love showing our CSA Harvest Share members where their food is being grown. If you would like to see the farm, just get in touch by phone or email and let's set up a visit.

How can I get ahold of you?

Send an email to fourbeatfarm(at)gmail.com
Give Farmer Naomi a call or text at 1-604-902-1514 (we are often out in the field but don't be afraid to leave a voicemail so we can get back to you)

What's with the name? Four Beats?

An excellent question! A horse’s walk is a four beat gait. Clip-clop, clip-clop. The walk of a willing team of workhorses is steady and purposeful, as they tread lightly on the earth and are fueled by solar energy in the form of plant matter that is then put back into the soil to grow again. Farming is rarely this poetic, but systems like these give this farmer food for thought and inspiration to grow better through the rhythm of the seasons.